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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
on npr. ladies are in washington this evening. were you offended by the "new york times" highlighting the word christian in its headline? mary katharine. >> yeah. look. i think it's a problem. first of all i'm a political animal but i try very hard in these instances not to immediately jump on a hobby horse and figure out where i can ride it immediately in the aftermath of a strategy like this. i think a lot of other people would do good to do that as well. the "new york times" many liberal activists, certainly desperately want an analog to extremist islam pat themselves on the back for being equal and making this equivalence. you know what? a lot of times the term use in order guy and if you read his writings it's certainly not mainstream fundamentalism. he talks about payingism as with many crazy people it goes down a rabbit hole. they have been referring to him as christian fundamentalists referring to the dug garrs in arkansas christian fundamentalists. is it having lots of children that makes a crazy threat or killing lots of children? it's insane. >> we can find alyssia no evide
for npr or pbs have to have enough money so that they do not have to go to work in the summer. i used to hold an elevator -- i used to work at an elevator factory. i would tell my professors that is what i did over the summer, and there would be a horrible chortle. i once worked in the copper wire factory. i need money to pay for school. now with the internship thing, it is remarkable. i wanted to say that the intern's i have been working with, they are really concerned about things like student debt. one of them said they call it financial aid, but it is a 7% non-negotiable loan. they do not have that gap year anymore. a lot of them are borrowed to the hilt. did they come out and they cannot play around. they cannot make a movie. they cannot go to europe. they cannot have fun for a year before they enter the workplace or even experiment with what they want to do. >> we're going to have some station identification, particularly for our listeners on sirius xm radio. this program can be seen of theide on the station's government network, voice of america. and on 300 american stations pu
npr can function just fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host: in your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can down the road. now we've reached the place we can no longer can get down the road. we'r
for birth control and f.d.a.-approved contraception. julie rovner of n.p.r. has been covering this story and joins us now. >> nice to be here. >> brown: explain the context a bit more here. this group was asked by the government to come up with a list. >> that's right. now the law as it passed last year wanted to encourage people who had insurance to take advantage of more preventive care. so it said the way to do that was to basically make it free. you pay your premiums but you don't have to pay any co-pays or deductibles to get preventative care. there were three categories of preventative care that were automatically covered that were written right into the legislation, certain services that were listed by the u.s. preventative health services, things like mammograms and colonoscopies, certain services that were listed by the american academy of prix for children and adolescents and vaccines that were listed by the c.d.c.'s vaccine category. there was a fourth category that came about because senator barbara mikulski from maryland got an amendment added that the secretary would have d
especially the potential deal. we are covering all of this for npr and he joins us from london, david, welcome. rupert murdock is in britain, who wants to talk to him and what about? >> there's a parliamentary committee hat has requested his presence, the presence of his son james murdock who is the top news corp. executive here in the united kingdom. and rebecca brook she's the chief executive over the news corporate newspapers here in the uk and she was editor and chief at the time of some of the most egregious alleged incident. >> do they have the power of a subpoena? >> there's some question about that. news international, the newspaper division has put out a statement saying that both mr. murdock, james murdock and ms. brooks will cooperate. but they didn't say necessarily that they'll testify so there's some question as to what form that cooperation will take. >> what does news international have to say about the latest allegations concerning former prime minister gordon brown? >> well he made these very anguished charges that news corp. had essentially targeted him, had sought
agency called the american world service. this on top of npr and pbs. good idea? liz is an author of journalist and fox news contributor who joins us every sunday at this time with a commentary. good morning liz. >> good morning, eric. this is about bowl jerry running amuck again. lee bollinger, the drastic call leftist academic who heads columbia university who was the same man who in 2007 i brought you invitation and the person of mahmoud ahmadinejad, the president of iran. and, of course, known to everybody as a great hater of jews. so he invites him to columbia university, which caused an uproar, high jewish population of students at columbia university but, nevertheless, he was getting press sod bowl jerry proceeded and then once he got him there he insulted him which even made better copy for him. so bollinger is not shy about seeking publicity. now, his latest try is about getting a sort of b.b.c. for american. a totally government-funded news service for america. bad idea. he says it's a good idea. let me give you an example. he wrote about this in the columbia journalism
not think planned parenthood should be getting $400 million from the american government. i think npr can function ju fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host:n your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can dow
"new york times" and watch c-span in listen to npr. >> also though "wall street journal." >> get balanced news. [laughter] >> of friends at the "journal" will like that. >> if founders were magically transported today, what would shock them and what would they recognize? >> the question is interesting. i give talks to the audience here and inevitably what with jefferson think of affirmative action or george washington st. of the invasion of iraq? interesting questions. questions ordinary people ask. i don't think anyone in england would say what do they think about care rents government? so we have a connection with these founders. an intimate connection. . . >> very self-conscious say work negative at that. no person in our history was so self-conscious to be virtuous that turned me off as a synonym we don't use the term that way. this interested means of interested but partial because we cannot believe anybody is truly does interested. the only does interested people left because they run for office. but umpires and referees they are the only ones we count on being truly does i
editor. chris s the president, you know, he's had interviews with npr, today he was in maryland at this university. is the president signaling that he may be getting close to agreeing to a deal that would raise this debt ceiling and that would have no tax hikes in it? >> reporter: well, he'll have to give his base something. he can't expect them to walk into this without even a symbolic tax increase. but, yes, obviously, what's happening now is the president is trying to soften the blow for his supporters being in a deep blue, very liberal state like maryland, being on a college campus be, rallying supporters in if a campaign-style event and, as you said, going on national public radio. these are all efforts on the president's part to reach out to liberals and say, look, i don't want to do a deal like this, but i have no choice so please understand me as i have to do this. martha: all right. we've got another piece of sound we want to play for everybody in relation to this. >> in order for us to solve the debt deficit problems, we've got to cut spending that we don't need, we ha
times, watch c-span, listen to npr. however, also read your history. >> well, i also read "the wall street journal" as well as "the new york times" to get a balanced view. [laughter] >> and our friends at the journal will like that. >> yeah. >> um, if founders were somehow magically transported here today, what would they recognize, and what would shock them? >> well, the question you ask is interesting in itself. i give a talk to people like this audience here, and inevitably someone will say, well, what would thomas jefferson think of affirmative action, or what would george washington think of the invasion of iraq? i mean, those are really fascinating questions that people, ordinary people will ask. and, you know, you can't imagine other countries doing that. i mean, i don't think anyone in england would say, well, what would one of the two william pitts' think of david cameron's goth? they just wouldn't ask that. so we have an intimate connection. and historians have mocked that. and i don't mock it. lincoln had that connection, however, and it's not so easy to mock lincoln. he
. let's try out this one, a quote from president obama on npr. he said, ronald reagan repeatedly talked about how irresponsible it would be to allow the full faith and credit of the united states to be impaired in any way. what's verdict on that one? >> we rated this one mostly true. we dug into the historical documents and we found reagan did say the u.s. should pay its debts and it should not be in document now, presidents usually support increases to the debt ceiling while congress comp plain it we know that, rated mostly true. >> finally, it one from victoria jackson, she's comedian and tea party supporter. a clause niptd obama care bill, which is now law, gives obama the right to form a private army. what do we make of that? >> this one got the pants on fire. it seemed to be a serious commentary so we took it seriously and checked it. the health care law does expand the public health service, which has a uniformed commission corps, but doctors and nurses, not members of the military no private armies in the health care bill. >> she is a comedian, maybe she was joke, we will give he
administrator for communications at nasa. mark, additional news at npr. captain mark kelly, astronauts, two-time shuttle pilot, commander, most recently commander of sts 134. spouse of a member of congress that has traveled to space. skip over the podium. melissa with news took media. she is the very effective speakers' committee chair who helped to get things going here for armor speakers' committee. lee perry man is the director of emps with associated press. he has organized two luncheons in a very short amount of time, and we are grateful for that. lowry is the nasa deputy administrator. elaine is the director in chief -- the editor in chief of "aerospace america." chris chambers, a professor at georgetown university and commentator for "russia today." mark, executive director with goi foundation. former national security assignment editor, reuter correspondent and pentagon producer at abc news. [applause] today's luncheon is not just about charles bolden, but about the future of nasa, which he leads. it is about his vision, president obama's vision, and some daunting and harsh budget r
is the administrator for communications at nasa. mark is the managing editor for digital news at npr. captain mark kelly is an astronaut, shuttle pilot, shuttle commander, and commander of the final mission for endeavour. the only spouse of a member of congress who less traveled into space. he is not just any -- it is kebra a difference. -- gabrielle giffords. [applause] we will skip over the podium for a moment. she is the committee chair who helps to get things going for our committee. we will skip over the speaker. he is the director of the associated press broadcast. he has organized lunches in a short amount of time and we're grateful for his work. lori is the deputy minister later. alain is director in chief of aerospace america. . he is a commentator for russia today. our partners in space. mark is the executive director and a former vice president of communication. he is also a former security assignment editor at abc news. today's newsmaker luncheon is not just about administrator charlie bolton but also about the future of nasa. it is about his vision and some daunting and budgetary real
the debt and, many tea partiers and many americans think we can cut out spending on npr and arts funding and foreign aid and that will take care of the debt problem and that is less than 1% of the budget, you have to cut the programs americans don't touched and the democrats keep swearing, oh, we'll never touch medicare and social security, well then we'll have debts and, deficits as far that's eye can see. >> michelle bachmann said she doesn't think we have to raise the debt ceiling. what are your thoughts. >> i'm very interested in the, because it doesn't make any sense. we have enough revenue coming in from the taxes, month-to-month, week-to-week, to service the national debt and pay social security, and medicare and medicaid. so i don't understand why our rating would go down unless the ratings agencies are trying to suck up to the democrats, on the other hand, i have seen some economists say, yes, it will lower our debt rating and will make -- it doesn't make any sense, because it is the equivalent of, you payer mortgage month-to-month and make those piloavements and you stop buying
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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